February 9, 2015

What I Read: The Good Girl

I have such mixed emotions about this book.  I've said before, I'm a pretty picky reader, it takes a lot for me to really fall in love with a book and become invested in its characters.  Truthfully, I usually don't give in a read a book until it has a pretty big fan base already or at the very least I've read tons of great reviews, i.e. Twilight, Harry Potter, Emily Giffin books (it's okay, call me a bandwagoner). I love reading and don't want to waste my time with books I have to force myself through, also paying for something I don't enjoy isn't fun.  But, back to the book at hand, The Good Girl, by Mary Kubica. I was searching for a solid 30 minutes for a new book to buy on my Nook when I came across this and immediately the synopsis hooked me. I downloaded the sample, and here we are 5 days later with the review, I could not put it down...




And then came the ending. If you've read the book you know what I mean.  The story is about Mia, a 25 year old girl who is kidnapped from a bar one evening by a guy named Colin.  Mia's family is fairly wealthy, as her dad is a very notable judge (and absent father) in Chicago and Colin is hired to kidnap Mia and deliver her to Dalmar (the man who hired Colin) where he will then hold her for ransom.  As I'm sure you can guess, things don't go exactly as planned and the story takes a different turn. The book switches point of view with each chapter being told through either Colin's, Gabe's (the detective working the case), or Eve's (Mia's mother) point of view. I loved that part, it was nice getting to really know the characters and how they felt and what they were thinking both before and after the incident occurred.



Caution.
If you don't want any spoilers, and by spoilers I mean the big bomb they drop on you, don't read any further as I will be revealing all of what happened in the book and will instead leave you with this; all in all, I do recommend this book if suspenseful novels like Gone Girl are your thing.









So, the book ends with Mia (who hasn't yet discovered she's pregnant with Colin's baby) being found, Colin getting shot and killed by the police and Mia's dad facing charges of accepting bribes in exchange for less harsh sentences to those he's convicted. Mia suffers severe Stockholm Syndrome which to me was kind of unrelatable, but kind of not, I hope I'd never have those same feelings in that situation. At this point, I liked the book a lot; it was interesting and suspenseful and I found the relationship between Mia and Colin intriguing because I just can't imagine myself falling in love with someone who kidnapped me.  The last chapter is a flash forward to before the kidnapping took place and it's Mia presenting a plan to Dalmar in which she will stage her own kidnapping.  Never. Saw. It. Coming.

I love books like this, and Gone Girl, in which there is such a huge plot twist that catches you completely off guard and you never suspect.  My complaint, so to speak, is why stage your own kidnapping to get back at your father for being a lousy dad? After Mia was rescued she searched her fathers office and found the evidence of  his accepting bribes, why not try that route in the first place?  Also, he was an absent dad and wouldn't pay for your college unless it was for a degree he supported, I'll agree that sucks, but cry about it in your nice warm bed in the big fancy house you live it.  I'm not saying the dad wasn't a total jerk, because he was,but staging your own kidnapping is a little bizarre.  Also, if I knew that at any moment of any day I could be kidnapped as per the agreement I set up, I'd be sure to carry a few extra things around with me, a toothbrush for one.  Maybe wear multiple layers of clothing as it is Fall in Illinois and will be getting really cold, really quick.  I also think that once I had to go to the doctor for pneumonia (which she did) I'd tell Colin that jig was up and to call Dalmar so we can all have a laugh at how dumb of an idea this was in the first place.

Even though there were some things that irked me, I really did enjoy this book, and I'd still recommend it.  It wasn't so much that I hated Mia planning her own kidnapping as it was I just can't relate to wanting to get back so badly at my rich father who lost interest in me when I didn't want to become a lawyer that I'd eat canned stewed tomatoes for weeks on end and use scraps of towels and whatever else I could find for my period.  He's a prominent political figure, fake a drug habit or leak a sex tape like a "normal" (slightly kidding) person and hit him where it where it really hurts, public ridicule and embarrassment, threaten his job. Not that I've given this any real thought or anything...

What are some books you've read lately? Do you recommend any?



5 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. I arrived at this page looking for spoilers, so thank you for providing them. I was halfway through the audiobook version, and extremely annoyed that nothing was happening. Once Mia and Colin are in the cabin—doing a whole lot of nothing for what seemed like an eternity—I lost my patience for this book. It was obvious that a Stockholm Syndrome plot was unfolding, but like you, that aspect of the book bordered on science fiction for me. Colin is so obnoxious, so sociopathic and foul (I lost count of how many "Shut ups!" are hurled in this book) that the idea of making him sympathetic in ANY way just put me off. Anyway, now that I know the big plot twist and the other hard-to-swallow elements revealed at the end, I'm so relieved that I didn't continue reading. One bright spot was the actress who read the part of Mia's mother; she was outstanding. Thank you for this excellent blog. I enjoyed it more than the book!

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  3. I had a question. Did it ever mention in the book when Mia and Colin had intercourse, because I waited the rest of the book after the flash forward to the first doctor appointment for that scene. I thought maybe the audience was able to have their own perspective on if the sex was consensual. And if mentioned, where is it in the book?

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  4. The book did imply that they had intercourse and that it was consensual. I don’t remember which chapter it was exactly, but it was the part after they had spent the night on the couch and Mia had told him that she didn’t not want to be alone.

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  5. ^^^ this is the reason I'm in discussions for this book right now!!! First I thought I missed a page? Then thought it was coming in the twist .... but it was never mentioned correct???

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